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View Full Version : What counts for a pitching "Save"?


XxBlueSpade2xX
03-07-2009, 09:36 AM
I'm winning big, like 18 or 20 to zero, I can't get any saves.
Do you have to be in a close game to get the save?
This Achievement is sucking my will to live!!!

Elekid
03-07-2009, 11:29 AM
Lol! If you're winning by that much, you don't need anyone saving anything. The game is in the bag. The way a pitcher earns a save is if you're up by no more than 3 runs and he comes in and finishes the game within 3 innings.

So lets say it's the top of the 8th, you're up by 2 runs and you're the home team. That, I would say, wouldn't be a bad time to bring in your closer and get the save.

That's just one basic senario. There are many that would qualify for a closer to come in and get the save.

DavidKelly18
03-07-2009, 03:45 PM
Isn't their only a save achievement in MLB 2k8?

SengIV
03-07-2009, 03:51 PM
Isn't their only a save achievement in MLB 2k8?

40 saves in a season with one player (20 games played)

ElderOmnivore
03-07-2009, 11:10 PM
He has the basic idea, but there is really three "basic" scenarios that a save is credited.

1) The one he mentioned. A guy comes into the game with his team winning by no more than three runs. He pitches at least one full inning and his team wins.

2) A guy comes into the game with the tying run already on base or the tying run being one of the first two batters he faces. In this matter, a guy can pitch just a third of an inning and still be credited.

3) This one is the one few people know about. This is one you could still do even winning 20-0. A save is awarded to anyone, regardless of the score who comes in and pitches at least three full innings. So, have your starting pitcher pitch six innings, go ahead and be up 20-0, and then bring in a guy to pitch the last three innings. He will get the save.

Now, these scenarios can be filled, but a save still may not be rewarded. Obviously, a guy can't get the save if he's the winning pitcher. So, if you're up 25-10 after three, but take out your starting pitcher and have someone else throw, three, or even four innings, the second guy is actually likely to get the win. This is because of the rule that a starting pitcher has to go at least five innings to be credited with a win.

Also, there can't be more than one save awarded in a game. So, if you're winning 3-0 after five, take out your starter, have a reliever go three innings, and then have your closer come in for the ninth, the closer will get the save and the second guy will get a pat on the back.

Yomnad84
03-08-2009, 06:26 PM
Saves:
Rule 10.20 in the Official Rule Book states:
Credit a pitcher with a save when he meets all three of the following conditions:
(1) He is the finishing pitcher in a game won by his club; and
(2) He is not the winning pitcher; and
(3) He qualifies under one of the following conditions:
- (a) He enters the game with a lead of no more than three runs and pitches for at least one inning; or
- (b) He enters the game, regardless of the count, with the potential tying run either on base, or at bat, or on deck (that is, the potential tying run is either already on base or is one of the first two batsmen he faces; or
- (c) He pitches effectively for at least three innings. No more than one save may be credited in each game

ElderOmnivore
03-08-2009, 09:12 PM
Saves:
Rule 10.20 in the Official Rule Book states:
Credit a pitcher with a save when he meets all three of the following conditions:
(1) He is the finishing pitcher in a game won by his club; and
(2) He is not the winning pitcher; and
(3) He qualifies under one of the following conditions:
- (a) He enters the game with a lead of no more than three runs and pitches for at least one inning; or
- (b) He enters the game, regardless of the count, with the potential tying run either on base, or at bat, or on deck (that is, the potential tying run is either already on base or is one of the first two batsmen he faces; or
- (c) He pitches effectively for at least three innings. No more than one save may be credited in each game

Yeah, that's exactly what I said. I just clarified the rules instead of posting them. However, what I typed is more drawn out. I should have posted this and then posted my descriptions of it.

Ollie The Magic Bum
03-08-2009, 10:58 PM
the second guy will get a pat on the back.

and a hold ;)

ElderOmnivore
03-08-2009, 11:25 PM
and a hold ;)

Haha, yes, one of those too.

BladeMDP
03-09-2009, 02:14 PM
One thing to clarify is that a pitcher does not have to pitch 1 full inning to get the save - he can come in with 2 outs, bottom/top of the ninth (or the last inning) with a 3 runs or less lead, record that last out, and get credit for the save.

ElderOmnivore
03-09-2009, 05:09 PM
One thing to clarify is that a pitcher does not have to pitch 1 full inning to get the save - he can come in with 2 outs, bottom/top of the ninth (or the last inning) with a 3 runs or less lead, record that last out, and get credit for the save.

That's only true if there's at least one runner on base which would make the second man he faces the tying run. If there's no one on base, the lead is three, and he gets only one out, it isn't a save.

Now, I'm not sure if they still count as a save in the game, but if they do, it's another thing wrong since it goes against the rules. You can read the rules up above again and realize that.

BladeMDP
03-10-2009, 04:50 PM
That's only true if there's at least one runner on base which would make the second man he faces the tying run. If there's no one on base, the lead is three, and he gets only one out, it isn't a save.

Now, I'm not sure if they still count as a save in the game, but if they do, it's another thing wrong since it goes against the rules. You can read the rules up above again and realize that.
not to belabor the point, but actually if it's a 3 run lead or less, the reliever pitcher can come in and pitch 1/3 of an inning, get just one out without allowing a baserunner and get credit for the save - for example, K-Rod (Francisco Rodriguez), on Jul 23 of last year, came into the game with 2 outs in the bottom fo the 9th, his team winning 14-11 - he faced one batter, no one on, got the out, got the save - try it in the game as well - have a 3 run lead, no one on base, have your closer come in with 2 outs in the 9th (or last inning), get that one out, he'll get the save

SilverSluggerMZ
03-10-2009, 08:35 PM
3) This one is the one few people know about. This is one you could still do even winning 20-0. A save is awarded to anyone, regardless of the score who comes in and pitches at least three full innings. So, have your starting pitcher pitch six innings, go ahead and be up 20-0, and then bring in a guy to pitch the last three innings. He will get the save.


I use this one constantly. Easiest way to get a save. I'm up 6-0, top 7th, bring in my closer to pitch the final 3 innings and record the save.

ElderOmnivore
03-11-2009, 12:24 AM
not to belabor the point, but actually if it's a 3 run lead or less, the reliever pitcher can come in and pitch 1/3 of an inning, get just one out without allowing a baserunner and get credit for the save - for example, K-Rod (Francisco Rodriguez), on Jul 23 of last year, came into the game with 2 outs in the bottom fo the 9th, his team winning 14-11 - he faced one batter, no one on, got the out, got the save - try it in the game as well - have a 3 run lead, no one on base, have your closer come in with 2 outs in the 9th (or last inning), get that one out, he'll get the save

No, you are wrong. Read the rules. Also

http://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/ALA/ALA200807230.shtml

That's the boxscore of the game. Look at the top of the ninth.

Jamey Carroll pinch hits for Sal Fasano batting 8th
--- 3 97% J Carroll Single to CF (Line Drive)
O 1-- 4 98% A Cabrera Strikeout Swinging
O 1-- 6 100% G Sizemore Strikeout Swinging
1-- 100% D Dellucci Defensive Indifference; Carroll to 2B
R -2- 3 99% " " Double to RF (Line Drive to Deep RF Line); Carroll Scores
Francisco Rodriguez replaces Jose Arredondo pitching
O -2- 1 100% B Francisco Groundout: SS-1B (Weak SS)

David Dellucci was on second base when K-Rod came into the game. That means the tying run was due up second. Which falls in line perfectly with the rule.

Like I said, if you do it in the game and it gives you the save, it's because they're not following the rules. Read the above rules and you'll see that just pitching 1/3 of an inning when you have a three-run lead and no one on isn't good enough for a "save." I'm just going off of what the official rules say.

SilverSluggerMZ
03-11-2009, 12:43 AM
No, you are wrong. Read the rules. Also

http://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/ALA/ALA200807230.shtml

That's the boxscore of the game. Look at the top of the ninth.

Jamey Carroll pinch hits for Sal Fasano batting 8th
--- 3 97% J Carroll Single to CF (Line Drive)
O 1-- 4 98% A Cabrera Strikeout Swinging
O 1-- 6 100% G Sizemore Strikeout Swinging
1-- 100% D Dellucci Defensive Indifference; Carroll to 2B
R -2- 3 99% " " Double to RF (Line Drive to Deep RF Line); Carroll Scores
Francisco Rodriguez replaces Jose Arredondo pitching
O -2- 1 100% B Francisco Groundout: SS-1B (Weak SS)

David Dellucci was on second base when K-Rod came into the game. That means the tying run was due up second. Which falls in line perfectly with the rule.

Like I said, if you do it in the game and it gives you the save, it's because they're not following the rules. Read the above rules and you'll see that just pitching 1/3 of an inning when you have a three-run lead and no one on isn't good enough for a "save." I'm just going off of what the official rules say.


Actually, I think Blade is correct, if my baseball knowledge is correct. If there is a 3 run deficit or less, the final pitcher who comes into the game gets credited with a save, whether or not runners are on base. I am about 99% sure.

EvilManDeadMan
03-11-2009, 12:52 AM
3) This one is the one few people know about. This is one you could still do even winning 20-0. A save is awarded to anyone, regardless of the score who comes in and pitches at least three full innings. So, have your starting pitcher pitch six innings, go ahead and be up 20-0, and then bring in a guy to pitch the last three innings. He will get the save.

Never in my life did i know that before.

ElderOmnivore
03-11-2009, 02:25 AM
Actually, I think Blade is correct, if my baseball knowledge is correct. If there is a 3 run deficit or less, the final pitcher who comes into the game gets credited with a save, whether or not runners are on base. I am about 99% sure.

It isn't. Read the rules that were posted up above.

Rule 10.20 in the Official Rule Book states:
Credit a pitcher with a save when he meets all three of the following conditions:
(1) He is the finishing pitcher in a game won by his club; and
(2) He is not the winning pitcher; and
(3) He qualifies under one of the following conditions:
- (a) He enters the game with a lead of no more than three runs and pitches for at least one inning; or
- (b) He enters the game, regardless of the count, with the potential tying run either on base, or at bat, or on deck (that is, the potential tying run is either already on base or is one of the first two batsmen he faces; or
- (c) He pitches effectively for at least three innings. No more than one save may be credited in each game

Look at "A" and "B" together. "A" clearly states that a guy has to pitch at least one inning with the lead no more than three. 1/3 or 2/3 is not one inning. "B" mentions that if he enters the game and at least the second batter he faces is the tying run.

Why would they even have "B" if at least one inning wasn't needed? They could just say, "Finish the game with your team winning by no more than three runs." They don't say that though. They clarify. That's because coming in and throw 1/3 of inning to close out a game isn't really "saving" anything. If they were going to do that, they might as well just have brought him in at the beginning of the inning.

I was looking for a specific game, but it's hard to find one. That's because whenever someone has a three-run lead, the usually bring in the closer to pitch all of the ninth. However, I did find this...

http://www.spartantailgate.com/forums/msu-red-cedar-message-board/114630-what-qualifies-save-baseball.html

Scroll down to the fourth guy. He says this, "(1) He enters the game in the final inning with a 3-run lead and nobody on base, but does not complete a full inning. Under these conditions, a pitcher must complete one full inning to earn a save"

Like I said, there has to be at least one guy on base with a 3-0 lead when a guy comes in to get the save. A three to nothing lead with no one on and throwing one-third of an inning doesn't net the save. That's the only time a lead of three or less doesn't net the save. That's because if it's just 2-0 and a guy comes in, then the second guy he faces would be the tying run. So, throwing a third of a inning would qualify him for the save.

NUTZILLA313
03-30-2009, 01:07 AM
Yea the only thing that worked for me in the franchise was having a 3 run lead and bringing in the closer, tried 4 runs, didn't work. So 3 runs is the biggest lead you can have to have your closer get credit for a "save". Though I didn't try getting 2 outs in the last inning then bringing in the closer to get the last out, that probably works, though I didn't try it, so give it a whirl.:uzi::eek: