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View Full Version : Drums, getting good.


Noisy Neighbour
11-01-2010, 01:26 PM
Ive always been really interested in learning to play the drums but due to several circumstances never got the chance.

Once rock band came out i had the chance to at least pretend to play the drums :P But now with rock band 3 introducing pro mode and more accessability for 3rd party kits im becoming increasingly interested in bettering my skills.

Ive recently forced myself to start playing on expert in the hope that my skill will increase the same way hard to expert on the guitar did for me in the days of guitar hero 3.

Im also looking to buy the ion drum rocker pro kit once they release it.

What i was looking for was some advice and a poke in the right direction. Most of my time is taken up by work and my girlfriend and my work means what time i do have free is not usually sociable hours so although i would love to have a go at drum lessons they are out of the question, at least for now.

Can anyone let me know of anything that could be of help to me, whether it be a website, a great book/video they used or even just some sound written advice.

My main areas that i have trouble with are:

Drum rolls (correct term?) As in several lets say red notes after each other.
Kick pedal. It seems so hard to continue the rhythm with my hands or feet when so much is going on.

Starstrukk X360A
11-01-2010, 01:28 PM
Well, I learned to play the RB drums through the Drum Career of the first Rock Band. It starts out with really simple songs and slowly becomes more difficult. I suggest that (:

Noisy Neighbour
11-01-2010, 01:33 PM
Well, I learned to play the RB drums through the Drum Career of the first Rock Band. It starts out with really simple songs and slowly becomes more difficult. I suggest that (:

Thats what im doing with RB3 at the moment :) Im slowly working my way through the difficulties in quickplay making sure i 5/gold star all songs in that difficulty until i move onto the next one. Just feels like the problems i listed at the end are holding me back :/

MuscularTea
11-01-2010, 02:41 PM
For the kick pedal I just learned overtime since some songs incorporate them a lot and some just throw them in every once in a while so it was working me into them, drum rolls though I had trouble with and I was determined to get them since I wanted to play drums for Everlong and Run to the hills. I learned through the drum trainer and some songs that were slower on rolls, I can't think of any on disc songs but download ones I played where one from Offspring I know of and D.O.A. from foo fighters that I can remember.

I still have trouble with some mostly the faster ones, plus the fact that my drum kit doesn't always pick it up, so I'm hoping I can afford the Ion too when it comes out.

GuitarGuruXXX
11-01-2010, 02:57 PM
RB's training section is actually pretty damn good for people just starting out.

TwistedFate
11-01-2010, 03:25 PM
If you don't mind spending a few dollars, these are a couple of books that every drummer should have. They are instructional books for drummers, but the practice routines they have are useful for RB drummers, specifically the problems you mention, too.

Don't let the title throw you, it helps with general stick control, not just "snare".
Amazon.com: Stick Control: For the Snare Drummer (9781892764041): George Lawrence Stone: Books: Reviews, Prices & more


Practice routines that force you to work on 4 way independence, good for getting your feet to do what you want them to do:
Amazon.com: 4-Way Coordination: A Method Book for the Development of Complete Independence on the Drum Set (0029156130904): Marvin Dahlgren, Elliot Fin: Books: Reviews, Prices & more


Also Google "drum rudiments" and practice those religiously.

MuscularTea
11-01-2010, 04:36 PM
I read some of the snare drum one since they have it at my university, and it's pretty good.

GuitarGuruXXX
11-01-2010, 04:50 PM
Buying and learning drums from books is fine but this is the internet, dude. So many other resources out there that you can get for free. Watch videos so you can hear as well as see. That way you know what you need to work on.

TwistedFate
11-01-2010, 05:08 PM
Buying and learning drums from books is fine but this is the internet, dude. So many other resources out there that you can get for free. Watch videos so you can hear as well as see. That way you know what you need to work on.

Except that you can't learn stick control and independence (the specific problems he is having) from watching a video off the internet. You can only get it through practice. Those books I listed are nothing but practice routines designed to improve your skills in those areas. They don't teach drums, they don't teach beats, they don't teach anything. They are just page after page after page of practice routines.

Noisy Neighbour
11-01-2010, 07:33 PM
If you don't mind spending a few dollars, these are a couple of books that every drummer should have. They are instructional books for drummers, but the practice routines they have are useful for RB drummers, specifically the problems you mention, too.

Don't let the title throw you, it helps with general stick control, not just "snare".
Amazon.com: Stick Control: For the Snare Drummer (9781892764041): George Lawrence Stone: Books: Reviews, Prices & more (http://www.amazon.com/Stick-Control-George-Lawrence-Stone/dp/1892764040/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1288623814&sr=8-1)


Practice routines that force you to work on 4 way independence, good for getting your feet to do what you want them to do:
Amazon.com: 4-Way Coordination: A Method Book for the Development of Complete Independence on the Drum Set (0029156130904): Marvin Dahlgren, Elliot Fin: Books: Reviews, Prices & more (http://www.amazon.com/4-Way-Coordination-Development-Complete-Independence/dp/0769233708/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1288623871&sr=8-2)


Also Google "drum rudiments" and practice those religiously.
Cheers dude will definately be buying those later, these were exactly the kind of things I was looking for.

The Nerevarine
11-01-2010, 10:21 PM
Go to any local music store and ask for newbie drum stuff. They'll give you some sticks, a practice pad, a book/video on rudiments, phone numbers of local drum teachers, and maybe a metronome or whatever else you need. You may want to buy a bass, hi-hat and snare to practice with if you have some cash and easy-going neighbors.

RB only goes to a point, even with their failure "Pro" mode. Most of what you hear when someone plays the drums is HOW they play the drums not just the sticking pattern. Keeping time and making noise, that's what a drummer does... in Rock Band you focus on the technical skill of limb independence and sight reading, which are both quality skills but are both auxiliary. Look at the White Stripes, that girl can barely play the drums but she plays the parts perfect for the music by keeping time and making the right noises.