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Weapon 117
06-07-2008, 05:18 PM
Sure, employees come and go in the gaming industry, but the following nine moves still managed to shock us.

The gaming industry is a dynamic one, with its professionals coming and going from company to company. It's a testament to how varied gaming is--not many people can stick to one game (or game company) for an extended period of time without wondering if the grass is greener elsewhere. The companies are also quite finicky, as many developers are only as good as their last game, and a flop can mean a firing. Nevertheless, there are some dedicated employees whose career moves have confounded us. Here's The 9 Most Shocking Resignations and Firings in Gaming!

http://www.gamepro.com/microsoft/xbox360/games/features/images/190408-1.jpg

The Leadup:

Phil Harrison joined Sony in 1992, overseeing the launch of the PlayStation brand, which won two consecutive console generations, and the PSP, which, while lagging far behind the Nintendo portable juggernaut, still sold quite well. The PlayStation 3, which is currently the lame duck of the console wars in terms of sales, has proved to be the undoing of many Sony executives, causing Ken Kutaragi to step down as Sony Computer Entertainment's CEO, and, some believe, Phil Harrison as the company's Worldwide Studios President. Harrison resigned (http://www.gamepro.com/news.cfm?article_id=163868) on February 25, 2008, less than a year-and-a-half after the PS3's release.

The Aftermath:

Not even a week after he resigned, Harrison was hired (http://www.gamepro.com/news.cfm?article_id=165928) as Infogrames' President and "Directeur General Delegue (we have no idea what that second thing is either), with the intention of reviving the Atari brand for the 83rd time. That's not the type of job a guy can just waltz into the office and get, so we're guessing Harrison had it lined up for quite some time. What's confusing is figuring out why Harrison would jump ship from a leaky battleship like Sony to a capsizing canoe like Atari.

http://www.gamepro.com/microsoft/xbox360/games/features/images/190408-2.jpg

The Leadup:

Gumpei Yokoi began at Nintendo in 1965. During the company's playing card days, he created the Ultra Hand, a ubiquitous children's toy, and when the company moved its focus to games, he really thrived. He created the Game & Watch, which birthed portable gaming, and was also responsible for the Game Boy, which revolutionized it. But he wasn't just a hardware guy; he headed a software development team responsible for creating Metroid and Kid Icarus. His last project with Nintendo was the Virtual Boy, which performed poorly (http://www.gamepro.com/gamepro/domestic/games/features/111823.shtml), and affected his status with the company greatly. He resigned a year after the failed console's release.

The Aftermath:

Yokoi went back to his roots and oversaw development of the Wonderswan with Koto laboratories. Unfortunately, he wasn't able to see the project to completion, as he died after being hit by a car in October of 1997. The Wonderswan ended up being one of the Game Boy's biggest competitors in Japan, taking a notable market share from the portable king.

http://www.gamepro.com/microsoft/xbox360/games/features/images/190408-3.jpg

The Leadup:

Peter Moore knew how to help companies succeed through difficult times. He helmed Sega as the company launched the Dreamcast, and helped ease the company into becoming a software-only publisher. When the Xbox needed a boost after its rough first years, Moore stepped in, becoming the face of the company. And the arms, as his massive guns became the company's billboard at its E3 press conference, using it to announce release dates for Halo 2 and Grand Theft Auto IV. Having righted the Xbox's ship, Moore once again moved on, resigning to work for EA (http://www.gamepro.com/news.cfm?article_id=123008).

The Aftermath:

Moore is currently the President of EA Sports, helping give a good name to a company that has been looked down upon by the hardcore crowd for rehashing tired series with yearly sequels. He's been instrumental in the introduction of new IPs like Facebreaker and GameShow. Many still have disdain for the house that Madden built, but Moore's just getting warmed up.

http://www.gamepro.com/microsoft/xbox360/games/features/images/190408-4.jpg

The Leadup:

Gertsmann had been a part of GameSpot's console editorial staff since that part of the site's inception. For the following 12 years, he produced hundreds of reviews, eventually ascending to the role of Editorial Director in 2007. His firing in November 2007, which was rumored to have been affected by Eidos' displeasure of his review of Kane and Lynch: Dead Men, set off a firestorm of controversy (http://www.gamepro.com/news.cfm?article_id=150648).

The Aftermath:

Gertsmann's departure was only the beginning of a mass exodus of GameSpot staffers, which still continues. Editors Alex Navarro and Ryan Davis both left the company as a result of Gertsmann's firing, with freelancer Frank Provo also moving on. Gertsmann co-founded GiantBomb.com (http://giantbomb.com/) with Davis, which takes a more laid-back approach to reviews, previews, and features. The site has been active since March, and promises to "blow up" this summer.

http://www.gamepro.com/microsoft/xbox360/games/features/images/190408-5.jpg

The Leadup:

While John Romero had plenty of experience as a developer, creating many memorable games for the Apple II. It wasn't until he moved onto SoftDisk to publish a disc-based gaming publication that his gaming development career really shifted into high gear. At SoftDisk, Romero met John Carmack, and the two started a new development company known as id Software. id was responsible for many of the PC's most influential titles, including Commander Keen, Doom, and Quake. Romero and Carmack's conflicting personalities eventually led to the former's forced resignation.

The Aftermath:

id Software has continued to develop Wolfenstein, Doom and Quake sequels, but has not developed a new IP in the 12 years since Romero's departure (the company has published a few, however). Romero headed up a new development company, Ion Storm, which was shut down less than five years after its inception, due to a string of less-than-stellar titles like Daikatana (http://www.gamepro.com/gamepro/domestic/games/features/133908.shtml). From there he founded Monkeystone, which also closed less than a half-decade later, before moving on to Midway to work on Gauntlet: Seven Sorrows. Romero is now working on an MMO with another newly-created development team, Slipgate Ironworks.

http://www.gamepro.com/microsoft/xbox360/games/features/images/190408-6.jpg

The Leadup:

Hironobu Sakaguchi expected to leave Square 16 years before he resigned. He created Final Fantasy in 1987, expecting it to be his last videogame, but the game became a massive hit, saving the beleaguered gaming company after a string of flops. He continued to work intensely on the eponymous RPG series, eventually becoming the President of Square in 1995. He had hoped to usher in a new era in the company in 2001 when he directed the company's first feature film, entitled Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within. When the movie flopped tremendously, Sakaguchi was on the outs with the company. While he still remained with the company for a few more years, playing a key role in the development of the popular Kingdom Hearts franchise, he never reached the same standing as he did before his film debut, and left the company in 2003.

The Aftermath:

Sakaguchi surprised many by starting up a new studio meant to compete with Square-Enix for RPG supremacy. The Microsoft-backed Mistwalker development studio has already produced two key RPGs for the Xbox 360--Blue Dragon (http://www.gamepro.com/microsoft/xbox360/games/reviews/131488.shtml) and Lost Odyssey (http://www.gamepro.com/microsoft/xbox360/games/reviews/161708.shtml), while Square-Enix has yet to create a next-gen RPG.


Source: http://www.gamepro.com/microsoft/xbox360/games/features/190408.shtml

Weapon 117
06-07-2008, 05:19 PM
http://www.gamepro.com/microsoft/xbox360/games/features/images/190408-7.jpg

The Leadup:

Dan Hsu started with Ziff-Davis in 1996, working almost exclusively for Electronic Gaming Monthly, except for a one-year gig heading up Gamers.com. He returned to the magazine in 2001, serving as its Editor-in-Chief for six years, increasing the magazine's industry status greatly during that period. In September of 2007, Hsu was promoted to 1UP's Editorial Director, but less than a year later, in April of 2008, he tendered his resignation.

The Aftermath:

Hsu has not made his next career move yet, though in his farewell blog post (http://www.1up.com/do/blogEntry?bId=8697326&publicUserId=5379799) at 1UP, he remarked, "For better or for worse, you'll hear from me again in the near future. I love the videogame business too much to stay away." Wherever he ends up, expect him to make news and make waves.

http://www.gamepro.com/microsoft/xbox360/games/features/images/190408-8.jpg

The Leadup:

Clover Studios was created by Capcom in 2003 and commissioned to create a new action game for the Nintendo GameCube. The result was Viewtiful Joe, one of the system's most unique and popular games. Over the next three years, Clover created three more original Viewtiful Joe titles and two ports, before working on a pair of unique PlayStation 2 titles--Okami, which was an adventure title starring a fox; and God Hand, an outrageous brawler. Neither title garnered great sales (despite the gaming media's almost unanimous praise of Okami) and Capcom closed the studio down (http://www.gamepro.com/news.cfm?article_id=99568) in 2007.

The Aftermath:

Capcom ported Okami to the Wii (http://www.gamepro.com/nintendo/wii/games/reviews/176168.shtml) in April of 2008, assigning the development to another studio--Ready at Dawn. The port was regarded by many as inferior to the PS2 version, and Capcom caught flak for excising the credit sequence that featured Clover staff members. Many of Clover's key developers have banded together to form a new team known as Platinum Games. Platinum Games is currently working on three new titles for Sega, including the highly-anticipated MadWorld (http://www.gamepro.com/nintendo/wii/games/previews/185888.shtml).

http://www.gamepro.com/microsoft/xbox360/games/features/images/190408-9.jpg

The Leadup:

Tomonobu Itagaki started his game development career with Tecmo in 1992. He was influential in creating the company's most revered franchise--the one-on-one fighting series Dead or Alive. His success with the series vaulted him high in the ranks of Tecmo, as he became the leader of the company's Team Ninja development team. Itagaki also was the creative force behind the resurrection of the Ninja Gaiden franchise on Microsoft's Xbox consoles. On the date of the release of his latest title, Ninja Gaiden II, Itagaki announced his resignation from Tecmo (http://www.gamepro.com/news.cfm?article_id=188988) and his intention to sue the company, citing tension with Tecmo president Yoshimi Yasuda and an unpaid bonus for his work on Dead or Alive 4 as the reasons.

The Aftermath:

Itagaki's next move is not yet known. Tecmo has confirmed that Team Ninja will continue to function (http://www.kotaku.com.au/games/2008/06/itagaki_leaving_tecmo_suing_tecmo-2.html) without its former leader.

Images created by Ivy Yup.

Source: http://www.gamepro.com/microsoft/xbox360/games/features/190408.shtml (http://www.gamepro.com/microsoft/xbox360/games/features/190408.shtml)

M85A21
06-07-2008, 05:25 PM
I never knew some of those good posting bud.

Ashz0r
06-07-2008, 06:48 PM
I think its a good thing Hironobu Sakaguchi left Square because it braught us the godly game Lost Odyssey. Even though I still regard FF7 one of the greatest games I've ever played Lost Odyssey defo is on the camparison.. where as I was finding FF games after 8 were beggining to get a bit crap. Hironobu Sakaguchi seems to have gone back to the roots of what made the series good with Lost Odyssey and I hope he keeps up the good work.

Perfectionist66
06-07-2008, 06:54 PM
I think the order shouldve been the complete opposite. Thats just my opinion, cause the tecmo deal was really NOT that big of an upset.

Tussell
06-07-2008, 06:56 PM
Shocking? I've been playing video games for more that 3/4th's of my life. Never heard of these people. I'm not shocked, upset, or amazed.

dm master
06-10-2008, 12:33 PM
Shocking? I've been playing video games for more that 3/4th's of my life. Never heard of these people. I'm not shocked, upset, or amazed.

I to havent heard of these people except the guy from gamespot and the last one cause i was interested in ninja Gaiden so i dont really have any specific thoughts on any of them except the gamespot dude cause i liekd his reviews.