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Sainsburys ridiculous policy


ferrari360max
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Today i stopped into Sainsburys (uk btw) during my lunch break to pick up a bottle of something for my friends birthday and as i went to the till to pay i was asked for my id as usual and then my friend was also asked, he was underage so i walked out not buying anything as i was refused.

 

I stopped in 2-3 hours later (on my own this time) and was still refused as i was seen in the store with a person under 18 earlier in the day. I have never had this problem before. Also apparently if a parent buys drinks with their shopping and have the kids with them they will not get served. So basically when did they bring this policy in and do you think its good or bad?

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It's a dumb idea for parents not to get served if they are with kids. If this is to try and stop adults buying alcohol for the kids around the corner then it's a useless rule and won't work.

 

I think they are trying to show that they care about the alcoholic youths of today. Unless there is another explanation but it sounds pretty friggin annoying.

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What a load of crap the same rule applys with Aldi stores no id no booze im 27 and still have to carry my id everywhere i go worst time was whan one of the checkout staff thought my driving licence was fake and tried to take it off me i had to wait till the store manager got there before i got it back i felt so humiliated

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Is this actualy a policy or was the person just being ignorant? I heard a bit of news saying someone wasnt alowed to sell a kid winegums and he said why and they pointed to the word wine. So maybe was just the worker. If not then I dont know because I know they dont put signs up saying about it. Maybe email them or talk to manager and if it not part of the policy you might get some vouchers off your shopping there or next purchase there.

 

Just ive never heard of this before. When i was younger and was in with my mum and sister my mum was able to buy drink for my sister (who was 18 but doesnt like buying stuff at tills) so my mum paid and never got asked who it was for or anything so no one got id'd and this was at a Sainsburys so I dont have a clue. Maybe its just certains stores have their own policys.

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This was a policy when I used to work for Tesco about 18 months ago. I agree with it, having to deal with a gang of drunk 15 years beating people up and robbing your store at 9pm on a Sunday because somebody gave them a half bottle of vodka to split between them. Its harsh to brand everyone with the same brush but it made my job a lot easier when you could refuse to sell alcohol to people. One point worth making though is that I didn't always enforce the policy, so this worker may not have taken a liking to you either.

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That's stupid. If a parent goes in with their 2 year old child, would they still refuse to let him or her purchase the alcohol because they're with a child?

 

Well there's some limits lol, that's just logic.. :p

This law is also used here in Russia, so I guess it's starting to be everywhere like this. Before there wasnt much troubles with alchool and young people, but there was some abuse and now there it is. The same thing happened to me the other day with my brother, he had to call someone else because I was ''locked'' from buying anything this day.

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Is this actualy a policy or was the person just being ignorant? I heard a bit of news saying someone wasnt alowed to sell a kid winegums and he said why and they pointed to the word wine. So maybe was just the worker. If not then I dont know because I know they dont put signs up saying about it. Maybe email them or talk to manager and if it not part of the policy you might get some vouchers off your shopping there or next purchase there.

 

Just ive never heard of this before. When i was younger and was in with my mum and sister my mum was able to buy drink for my sister (who was 18 but doesnt like buying stuff at tills) so my mum paid and never got asked who it was for or anything so no one got id'd and this was at a Sainsburys so I dont have a clue. Maybe its just certains stores have their own policys.

 

Yeah its their policy, and it was the manager that asked me to leave the second time. Seems its pretty common in stores although i have never encountered it before.

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I've had this aswell, and a couple of my friends. I'm 21 and I was in a tesco and they refused to serve me (I had ID), but my friend who is older than me had no ID with them so I wasn't allowed anything. It's a pretty new thing thats been introduced, and its a bit ridiculous really.

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This was a policy when I used to work for Tesco about 18 months ago.

We have this we problem at our local tesco. im 21 but I dont own any ID, my other half is 19 and he cant buy alcohol if Im with him so I have to either go to a separate till or just go out the store altogether.

Even now im pregnant and they can see Im in now state to drink they still wont serve him if Im there.

 

Its kinda daft from my point of view but from the stores point I understand why they would do it.

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Since I work for Sainsburys I thought I would try and answer the OP, even though the alcohol laws in Scotland are slightly different I believe.

 

They use this policy called "think 25" when people try to buy alcohol, basically if you don't look over 25 they will ask for ID from the buyer and whoever is with them. Obviously if you can't all prove your age, you can't buy it. It is taken pretty seriously, because if the person serving at the till is found to be selling drink to under age people they basically lose their job, and if unlucky get a few thousand pounds fine from the police. The store also potentially loses the licence to sell alcohol, so they are just better being safe than sorry, inconvenient as it is for the customer.

 

As for you going back 2-3 hours later by yourself and not getting sold, that's just unlucky in my opinion. Someone just must have recognised you and told a manager. Again its better safe than sorry from their point of view.

 

Parents not getting sold alcohol with children I haven't heard of, and is probably not true, unless it's blatantly obvious the alcohol is for someone under age. The person at the till just uses their judgement, and if in doubt won't sell it.

 

So basically yeah it sucks, but the policy is used for a good reason.

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Since I work for Sainsburys I thought I would try and answer the OP, even though the alcohol laws in Scotland are slightly different I believe.

 

They use this policy called "think 25" when people try to buy alcohol, basically if you don't look over 25 they will ask for ID from the buyer and whoever is with them. Obviously if you can't all prove your age, you can't buy it. It is taken pretty seriously, because if the person serving at the till is found to be selling drink to under age people they basically lose their job, and if unlucky get a few thousand pounds fine from the police. The store also potentially loses the licence to sell alcohol, so they are just better being safe than sorry, inconvenient as it is for the customer.

 

As for you going back 2-3 hours later by yourself and not getting sold, that's just unlucky in my opinion. Someone just must have recognised you and told a manager. Again its better safe than sorry from their point of view.

 

Parents not getting sold alcohol with children I haven't heard of, and is probably not true, unless it's blatantly obvious the alcohol is for someone under age. The person at the till just uses their judgement, and if in doubt won't sell it.

 

So basically yeah it sucks, but the policy is used for a good reason.

 

I can understand the policy at the time, but later on in the day i do not. Also here is an example of just buying the shopping with his son.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1201923/RAF-officer-banned-buying-alcohol-shopping-son-17.html

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I used to work at Tesco.

 

Its a case of the policy being enforced to the extreme. It all comes down to discretion. If a Parent comes in with a kid who is 12, I will serve them as IMO, it wont be for them. If they come in with a kid who is 16ish, its time to request ID.

 

Variables:

 

Adult buying.. (Responsible/Non-Responsible looking)

Age of child.. (Younger means more likely to realise its not for them)

What they are buying... (This is the big one IMO. If your buying a bottle of something cheap, or usual for under-age people to drink, then your more likely to both get ID'd)

 

Its harsh, but as a worker, I was not happy to take any risk, when that risk is attached with a Criminal Record, Fine + Loss of job.

 

Just unlucky I guess man. sorry.

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I agree it's ridiculous, and it annoys me even more when our group (who are all mid 20s) are asked for ID by a kid on the checkout that looks underage himself. I can understand the policy, but alot of the time it comes down to judgement and it seems that more and more checkout operators are just using the blanket rules for serving alcohol.

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They seem to do this in most supermarkets in the UK. I have had this happen in Asda and Morrisons upto now so i'm guessing it's being used throughout.

 

I was with 3 friends in Asda and got refused because one of them didn't have ID with him. Then Morrisons I was withmy friend and his dad. Clive (dad) is in his 40's and my mate is younger than me but still very over age. They refused to give Clive his drink aswell. Lame. I always have ID with me so I just go in alone from now. It's messed up the UK.

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  • 3 weeks later...

This happened in my area not to long back. Here's the link

 

http://www.portsmouth.co.uk/newshome/Tesco-humiliate-wheelchair-user-over.5533104.jp

 

I mean how discusting is that? Totally humiliating a man so that his own daughter does carry a bag. I mean yeah checking ID and refusing people but making a huge scene out of it for someone who clearly had no choice but to use his own teeth. At least someone working in Tesco's could have at least carried the bag to the car to save the poor bloke shame.

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This happened to me over the summer...

Me and my mum went to sainsburys to buy some food/drinks for the barbecue we were having and my mum bought a few bottles of wine and beer and stuff.

 

I'm 17 years old but look around 15 and the cashier asked if the alcohol was for me. My mum denied it because it actually wasn't (lol) and then the cashier refused to believe my mum and wouldn't sell us it.

 

Wow did my mum make a scene...I just went and sat down on them chairs they have (:

 

This happened in my area not to long back. Here's the link

 

http://www.portsmouth.co.uk/newshome/Tesco-humiliate-wheelchair-user-over.5533104.jp

That is the most ridiculous thing that i've ever heard. How much more pathetic can you get?

Aren't parents allowed to give their child alcohol in the home over the age of 5?

 

Also, i mean, ethically. How could someone do that?

Edited by Agent Aero
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